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So you've read the Beginner's Guide and want to explore more Gemmotherapy resources? Check out recent blog posts, upcoming courses, and books from Lauren Hubele.

Latest Posts on Gemmotherapy

Gemmo Memo: Dog Rose

By Lauren | February 23, 2020

As you approach the forest edge, it’s hard to miss spotting the distinctive, thorned tangled of canes and delicate pink blossoms of Dog Rose. The prickly, arching stems commonly form hedgerows between pasture lands or support its climb up and over rock walls or other co-existing shrubs. Dog Rose thrives in all types of soil…

Gemmo Memo: European Blueberry

By Lauren | February 14, 2020

Vaccinium myrtillus is found natively in Northern Europe, the British Isles, Ireland, Iceland and across the Caucasus into northern Asia. It can be found growing in its natural state across heathlands, thriving in acidic and nutrient-poor soils. These small plants grow close to the ground and are under one foot tall (25-30 cm).  For those…

Gemmo Memo: Field Maple

By Lauren | February 7, 2020

Acer campestre, also known as Field or Hedge Maple, is a fast growing, medium tree maturing to 30-50’. Widespread in its natural state, Field Maple can be found across Europe and as far east as the Caspian Sea. Quite tolerant of most soil types, this tree is best known for its showy autumn color and…

Gemmo Memo: Silver Birch

By Lauren | February 1, 2020

Betula verrucosa, Silver Birch tree, is the one species in which the seeds, sap and bud are each made into Gemmotherapy extracts. Each one of these extracts offer a very specific tonifying action, and all three have an impact on the kidneys.   Let’s begin with the Bud.  The primary action of the extract made from…

Gemmo Memo: Common Birch

By Lauren | January 24, 2020

The tree Betula pubescens, also known as Betula alba, has many common names, including downy birch, moor birch, white birch, European white birch or hairy birch. Common Birch, as we refer to it in Gemmotherapy, is native to and found abundantly throughout northern Europe and northern Asia. Relatively short-lived, it grows to nearly 100 feet…

Gemmo Memo: Common Alder

By Lauren | January 17, 2020

Native to Europe, Russia, Turkey and Iran, Alnus glutinosa grows up to 70’ (21 meters) in height, always near or in water. Classified as an invasive species in the United States, it was originally planted for erosion control. It’s quite easy to recognize because Common Alder is the only broad-leaved plant to produce cones. Each…

Gemmo Memo: Black Honeysuckle

By Lauren | January 3, 2020

The shrub Lonicera nigra, commonly known as black honeysuckle or black berried honeysuckle, is most likely to be discovered under the canopy of a coniferous or mixed forest, where it would bask in the filtered sunlight.  Unlike the cultivated honeysuckle vine, this honeysuckle shrub only grows to a height of 4-5 feet tall. Not widespread…

Gemmo Memo: Blackthorn

By Lauren | December 20, 2019

Blackthorn, Prunus spinosa, is a shrub native to Europe and Western Asia. Growing 6-10 feet in height, it was commonly used throughout history along with Hawthorn to border fields as a protection from animals. Its creamy white flowers, which appear before the leaves, were a signal of the arrival of spring. Blackthorn shrubs appear in…

Gemmo Memo: Black Currant

By Lauren | December 13, 2019

Native to Europe and Asia, black currant shrubs grow well in damp, fertile (but not waterlogged) ground and are intolerant of drought. This moderate-size shrub develops as wide as it is tall, which is about 5 feet (1.5 meters). The broad, long aromatic leaves, with five lobes stemming from the leaf base and serrated margins,…

Gemmo Memo: Almond, Prunus amygadalus

By Lauren | December 6, 2019

Known for their beautiful pale blossoms, welcoming the early days of spring, almond trees are native to the geographic region known as Iran and its surroundings. Almond trees are actually among the earliest domesticated fruit trees (3000-2000 BC), and it is in an orchard where you are most likely to encounter one.  A relatively small…